Chris Collins’ Iranthmetic

3 Dec


The image to the left of this text shows my Congressman’s Facebook reaction to a deal that the “P5+1” countries reached with Iran over its nuclear weapons and energy program. 

The deal was a modest thing, significant for the fact that Iran came to the table in apparent good faith at all. It would dilute existing nuclear material so that it could only be used for energy, and not weaponry, and there would be a 6 month halt to its nuclear weapon program altogether. The aim would be a final deal within 6 or 12 months, allowing for one 6 month extension of the pause. 

Iran’s economy has been absolutely devastated by international sanctions over its nuclear program, and it has a huge incentive to roll back its pariah status. The world benefits if Iran has no nuclear weapons to use against its myriad enemies. To my mind, the whole thing should be rolled into deal whereby Iran ends its support of Hezbollah and recognizes Israel, but diplomacy is often about baby steps. 

So, turning to the representative of NY-27, we could certainly fisk his simplistic statement to kingdom come – e.g., it wasn’t an “Obama Administration” deal, it was a deal between Iran on the one hand, and the US, Russia, China, and the European Union (read: the UK, France, and Germany – it’s called “P5+1” because it includes the 5 permanent members of the UN Security Council, meaning it would be veto-proof in that body, plus Germany) on the other.  Germany, for its part, does huge business with Iran, and all of these powers – working together – have the ability together to put great pressure on Iran to behave and comply. 

I could snarkily comment on Collins’ recent praise of Russian autocrat Vladimir Putin, or the fact that Collins chooses to manufacture his tchotchkes in China, but I also realize that his public pronouncements are not meant to be taken seriously. I think that we’re witnessing an Andy Kaufman-like comedic performance art that is, unfortunately, unfunny and predictable. Collins is a caricature of a closed-minded conservative backbencher. 

The point of diplomacy, of course, isn’t just to talk with friends. The diplomatic process involves talking with our sworn enemies, as well; to work out differences in a peaceful way rather than war. 

So, why would our caricature be so knee-jerkedly opposed to a rather contextually modest, temporary deal to freeze Iran’s nuclear program in exchange for the easing of some sanctions? Because he’s effectively been paid to oppose it

Just this past August, Collins took his son on an all-expenses-paid trip to Israel. The trip was financed by a private lobbying group, the American Israel Education Foundation. It paid for transportation, lodging, meals, and all incidentals for Collins (who is well able to afford spending $18,000 to visit Israel) and his son, who visited Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Ramallah, and Bethlehem. 

WGRZ called Collins out on it

Dr. Craig Holman with the government watchdog group Public Citizen said the trips are designed to influence and lobby members of Congress.

“These types of travel junkets have long been one of the favorite means for special interests and lobbyists to use to try to influence members of Congress and peddle their wares on Capitol Hill,” Dr. Holman said.

While AIEF is a non-profit, it is simply the charity wing of the AIPAC, the American Israel Public Affairs Committee. AIPAC is the largest pro-Israel lobby in America.

AIPAC and its lobbyists are prohibited from giving lawmakers or staff members gifts, including trips. So the group’s charity wing does it for them.

“(The ethics committees) have allowed a lobbying organization — any lobbying entity — to set up a 501(c)3, a charity wing even just on paper,” Dr. Holman said. “And if that (c)3 itself doesn’t employ lobbyists, then it can pay for these congressional travel junkets.”

Neither Congressman Reed nor Congressman Collins would speak with 2 On Your Side either on camera or by phone. They each emailed statements through their spokespeople.

“Congressman Collins’ trip – vetted and approved by the House Ethics Committee – was paid for exclusively by private donations at zero expense to taxpayers,” Collins Spokesperson Grant Loomis said by email. “The bipartisan effort involves both Democrats and Republicans and is critical to educating Members of Congress on the importance of the U.S.-Israel relationship and protecting American interests in the Middle East.”

Israel, for its part, has slammed the Iran nuclear deal, and her Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has called it an “accommodation” and “political theater” that will “wreak havoc” in the region. Well, not all of Israel. For instance, Justice Minister Tzipi Livni has taken a much more conciliatory tone, arguing that the 6 month Iran deal gives Israel an opening to solve the Palestinian crisis so that Israel and the Arab world can be united in putting pressure on Iran. The opposition Labour Party has blasted Netanyahu, as has at least one of his former associates, 

On April 27, former Shin Bet (Israel Security Agency) director Yuval Diskin said Netanyahu and Defense Minister Ehud Barak were not fit to stand at helm of the Israeli regime. 

“I will tell you things that might be harsh. I cannot trust Netanyahu and Barak at the wheel in confronting Iran. They are infected with messianic feelings over Iran,” Diskin said. 

Later on Sunday, Former Mossad chief Meir Dagan expressed support for Diskin, saying he was stating his “internal truth.” 

Israel’s Chief of Staff Lieutenant General Benny Gantz said on April 25 that he does not believe Iran will pursue nuclear weapons after years of efforts made by Tel Aviv and its allies to convince the world otherwise. 

Gantz described Iran’s leadership as “very rational” who would not make such a decision. 

There hasn’t been a havoc-free day in the last 3,000 years anywhere surrounding Israel, given its neighbors’ insistence that it be eliminated. Yet with careful diplomacy, Arab and Islamic enemies have succumbed and recognized Israel. It happened with Egypt and Jordan, it could happen with others if talks would take place, but as with all things in the Middle East, it’s just too complicated and fraught with peril. 

If Chris Collins was so effusive with his praise for Putin’s supposed out-maneuvering in Syria, which pledged to destroy its chemical weapons to avoid American military action, his heart should be just as full of praise for the Iran deal, because there isn’t a damn reason why anyone would trust Syria’s Bashir Assad more or less than any of Iran’s mullahs. 

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9 Responses to “Chris Collins’ Iranthmetic”

  1. Black Rock Lifer December 3, 2013 at 9:01 am #

    Collins is a hack, willing to say anything to further his agenda and feed his ego. His dream of enabling an American plutocracy depends on destroying government credibility and effectiveness. He is a lightweight, arrogant and petty, and an embarassment to WNY.

    • UncleBluck December 3, 2013 at 1:17 pm #

      Much like his cohorts Collins is unable to form any kind of coherent thought/stance on any of the issues plaguing our nation/the world……instead, like his comrades he parrots the talking points provided him and the rest of the brainless GOP……such as Obamacare which will be henceforth known as “Hillarycare”…to try and stave off the asswuppin coming in 16’….and if that doesn’t work, which it wont, there is always voter suppression…which also wont work for long, given the changing dynamics of our population….cant wait to see what they come up with next to try and put off the inevitable……

  2. Sean Danvers December 3, 2013 at 9:50 am #

    Hey now, Israel is a big military customer of ours. We need to be in the business of keeping them in business. Chris Collins understands that, and he’s paid well to do so. Truly he is a patriot for wanting to foster military brinksmanship dimplomacy in the Middle East. I mean, what could really go wrong with that plan?

  3. Michael Rebmann December 3, 2013 at 9:58 am #

    On the issue of Foreign Policy, Conservative Republicans are very rarely right.

    • Black Rock Lifer December 3, 2013 at 11:00 am #

      Conservative Republicans are also very rarely right on Economic Policy. I don’t believe they have any real philosophy other than working to ensure the wealthy dictate our public policy and continue to concentrate our nations wealth at the top. Republicans are little more than lobbyists for the rich, shamelessly advocating for the most powerful while ignoring the plight of the rest of us.

  4. Julia C-H December 3, 2013 at 10:35 am #

    Southern Tier Congressman Tom Reed is on board with Collins too. Lucky us (rolls eyes) http://www.wrfalp.com/reed-wants-sanctions-brought-back-against-iran/

  5. Eliz0414 December 3, 2013 at 10:53 am #

    Agh! How do we get rid of him?

  6. jamesholstun December 3, 2013 at 12:09 pm #

    Why do you want to weaken Hezbollah–so that Israeli can have the unopposed right to savage Lebanon? Hezbollah is the only effective defense force that Lebanon has. And how can Iran recognize Israel when Israel hasn’t declared any borders? And recognize it as what–as a state that gets to ethnically cleanse inhabitants whose ethnicity and religion it doesn’t like–not just in 1947-8 and 1967, but in 2013, when it is expelling Muslim Bedouin Israelis from the Negev? Why does this country deserve recognition, exactly?

  7. starrrbuck December 4, 2013 at 8:26 pm #

    What’s any big difference between what you quoted from Collins your district’s freshman House member compared to this from New York’s senior U.S. Senator, the 3rd-ranking in the Senate majority party?

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-politics/wp/2013/11/23/congressional-reaction-to-the-iran-nuclear-deal/

    Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.), third-ranking Senate Democrat:

    “I am disappointed by the terms of the agreement between Iran and the P5+1 nations because it does not seem proportional. Iran simply freezes its nuclear capabilities while we reduce the sanctions.

    It was strong sanctions, not the goodness of the hearts of the Iranian leaders, that brought Iran to the table, and any reduction relieves the psychological pressure of future sanctions and gives them hope that they will be able to gain nuclear weapon capability while further sanctions are reduced.

    A fairer agreement would have coupled a reduction in sanctions with a proportionate reduction in Iranian nuclear capability.

    The goal of the administration is to eliminate all of Iran’s nuclear weapons-making capability by the end of the final negations; it is still my hope they can achieve that goal. As for additional sanctions, this disproportionality of this agreement makes it more likely that Democrats and Republicans will join together and pass additional sanctions when we return in December. I intend to discuss that possibility with my colleagues.”

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