Tag Archives: Testimony

Woe is Mo: #Hassan uses the Chewbacca Defense

2 Feb

Muzzammil Hassan completed his direct testimony yesterday, leading the jury through his version of the events of January and February 2009.

It was largely similar to the previous days of Hassan testimony, whereby he narrated a story for the jury over frequent prosecution objections and stumbling over evidentiary issues.  Hassan needed to tell the jury all about his feelings, at the hands of Aasiya Zubair‘s “bullying” and “controlling” behavior.

Aasiya clearly wanted out of the marriage.  Hassan testified that he felt “blindsided” by service upon him of the divorce papers, together with an order of protection forcing him out of the house.  He testified about feeling embarrassment and shame at earlier restraining orders, feeling humiliated having to visit his kids under court-ordered supervision.  Hassan went to great pains to paint Aasiya as what he termed an “evil dragon” whose mood would swing from sweet to sour like a pendulum.  He testified earnestly to the jury that Aasiya would be nice to him on minute, while behind his back she was meeting with lawyers and plotting to divorce him.

So?

He testified about two lunchtime meetings that he and Aasiya had at the conference room at Bridges during the six days between service of divorce papers and the murder.  At one, Aasiya purportedly offered to drop the divorce if Hassan would agree to budget $10,000 per year for her and the kids to visit Pakistan every year.  Turning to the day of the murder, he testified that they held a volatile meeting at lunchtime where Aasiya demanded that he break off contact with two female friends of his.  He testified that at this point, Aasiya pulled a knife on him.

Hassan had testified about text messages he had sent to one of them several weeks before the murder, where he was telling her that his wife was a “bully” and expressing thanks to this friend for paying attention to him.

So? If his wife was such a bully, and he had a support system built-in by way of psychological counseling and friendships, he didn’t have to kill anybody.  He could have just let the divorce go through and be free of the supposed “dragon”.

He felt very hurt after that meeting, and took a drive to clear his head.  He happened upon the Hamburg Wal*Mart where he coincidentally walked in and happened to unexpectedly go to the hunting knife department and randomly bought two large knives.  He testified that he got one to help a friend “chop wood”, and another for protection from Aasiya.

His testimony was that he was going to meet Aasiya to call the other friend at 6pm.  She was to meet him at the studio.  He waited for her, and she came in and started walking to the conference room, saying they had to make that call.  When Aasiya reached into the pocket from where she had previously pulled a knife, Hassan freaked out and murdered her with multiple stab wounds and a beheading.

He began breaking down on the stand, explaining that he was relieved that he had slain the “evil dragon”, that the weight of the world had been lifted off his shoulders, and that his kids would not have to live with a monster anymore.

The problem for Mo Hassan is that the objective evidence did not corroborate his story. He parked in an unusual spot in an empty parking lot.  He parked out of sight, where his wife wouldn’t see him.  The text messages between them showed that she was going to the studio to drop clothes into his car.  She had the kids wait in the car. He texted her that he had left the studio – that she should put the clothes in the office.  But he waited in the office for her.  She didn’t know he was there.  It was a darkened studio, where he lay in wait for his wife, whom he had just told that he was not there.  It took 37 seconds from the time she opened the door until her head was severed from her body.  He had $4900 on him.  He had used $100 to buy the knives, he gave the rest to his eldest son, who was waiting outside for his murdered stepmother.

This wasn’t the sudden, unplanned, unexpected act of a man who snapped.  This wasn’t a battered husband who killed her before she killed him.  This was a methodically pre-planned execution.

If he wanted out of the relationship, he had it.  She had filed for divorce.  The notion that he felt trapped in an abusive relationship is nonsense.  In cases of battered spouse syndrome, the abuser maintains control over the other person in the relationship – divorce is out of the question, as it would break that control.  There was only one person in the relationship of Aasiya Zubair and Muzzammil Hassan who didn’t want a divorce to take place, and that person is the defendant.

It’s interesting that the only two emotions Hassan has displayed during this trial have been anger and, only yesterday, crying.  I’m sure he feels sadness that he’ll never be a free man again, that he will not be a dad to his kids, that he’s in this situation; I’m sure those were tears of relief at having finally told his story.  Not once, however, did he express an iota of remorse for having murdered his wife so violently.  He didn’t cry for leaving his kids without their mother.  He didn’t cry for having committed a needless homicide.  He didn’t cry for having murdered this woman whom he supposedly loved so much he went out of his way to stop the divorce.  It doesn’t add up.  It’s the Chewbacca defense in real life.

And so he ended his testimony.  Nothing was his fault.  It was all Aasiya’s fault.  He was the loving husband, going to counseling, trying to save his marriage.  His wife was a demanding bitch who said mean things to him, so he snapped. He destroyed her body, now he concluded about four days’ worth of destroying her reputation. His domination is complete. Cry, Mo, cry.

Today, the prosecution commences its cross-examination of the defendant.  Hopefully, ADA Colleen Curtin Gable will conduct it, as it would be interesting to see Hassan’s demeanor under tough questioning from a strong, intelligent, female in a dominant role at this stage in the trial.  I don’t think he’ll fare well.

(Report based on personal observation of the trial, along with following the #Hassan hashtag and the Buffalo News’ live blog).